10 Apr

Jazz Dance and Charleston Synchronized Rhythm

The Charleston is an African-American dance originated from the Charleston Harbor area in Charleston, South Carolina best remodeling crew. The Charleston is a traditional high-low beat dance named for the historical harbor city of Charleston, South Carolina dating back to the period of the mid-nineteenth century. The Charleston rhythm was first popularized by a 1922 song called “The Charleston”, by Blind Willie McTell. Today the Charleston rhythm is still popular among many black people.

Modern Charleston Artists

Charleston has developed into a cultural center of black arts and culture with annual conferences, workshops, and performances by local and national groups. This rich history and cultural heritage have spawned a large number of contemporary artists in the area of Charleston that continue to create works using the basic step forms of Charleston syncopated rhythms. Most of these modern day Charleston artists are of African descent, although there are a few others that are of Hispanic descent.

Among the more popular forms of Charleston syncopated rhythm are the Charleston Slang, Charleston Backslide, and Charleston Pause. The Charleston Slang is one of the more easily recognizable of these because it is performed almost nightly at most bars and restaurants throughout Charleston. In this form of Charleston syncopated rhythm, dancers perform a series of footwork and finger walking patterns while chanting nursery rhymes and simple songs. The Charleston Backslide is another well-known version of this dance, where dancers move in a series of steps similar to a stroll in the park, except they shift their weight from one foot to the other. Finally, the Charleston Pause is similar to the Charleston Slang but is performed on a short four stringed reed like instrument. Most dancers in the area, who are black or of color, use this one to perform polka dot swirls or other ethnic inspired patterns.